EU, US reach ‘agree in principle’ on transatlantic data flows – TechCrunch

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Hello and welcome to Daily Crunch for Friday, March 25, 2022! This is one of the last Daily Crunch intros I’ll write for you. I will miss our daily chats and hello. But on Friday there is no time to relax. We have work to do! Let’s go! † Alex

The TechCrunch Top 3

EU, US reach preliminary data deal: if you don’t follow Natasha Lomas, our top reporter on all things regulation and privacy when it comes to the tech world, it’s time for you to do that. Lomas reports that the EU and the United States “have reached an agreement in principle on a renewed agreement on transatlantic data flows”, potentially ending a long period of uncertainty over moving bits across the Atlantic. Speaking of massive regulatory changes, the EU made headlines again today for signing deals for what we called ‘major competition reforms’ in the area. On the roll are things like interoperability of forced messages. Which means the days of closed iMessage could be coming to an end? It’s not clear what impact the rule changes will have in the United States, but big things are brewing across the pond. Instacart is trying to make its equity more competitive: There is some nuance to the mechanics at play, but after raising a stock valuation of nearly $40 billion last year, Instacart has re-priced the value of its equity in view of workers compensation. At a much lower price. TechCrunch was curious to see if we see the start of a trend for the year as other unicorns might choose to take a similar step to ensure they can hire people.

Startups and VC

The creative economy is: card up and right: like there’s no tomorrow, and everyone wants a piece of the action. The strong marketing automation HubSpot launched a new podcasting program aimed at advanced marketers looking to improve their content production game, including paying the creators for their followers depending on the number of content consumers. Of course, the creative economy also has a downside; content moderation remains a challenge, and a few ex-TikTok moderators are trying to rally enough support to file a class action lawsuit against the social media belle de jour for the psychological trauma they claim they have experienced in the course of their role as moderator.

Meanwhile, the trend of working from home seems to extend into the space outside “avoiding offices like the plague during a literal plague.” Firstbase has raised a $50 million round to further facilitate remote employee onboarding and logistics.

Other notable things on this beautiful Friday:

Cloud provider’s default retention policies aren’t enough, you’d better back up your SaaS

Network cables connected to the cloud

Image Credits: Eoneren (Opens in new window) / Getty Images

Much work has moved to the cloud these days as SaaS tools replace traditional on-prem software in the enterprise.

But while SaaS tools make life easier, the nature of cloud companies and their data retention policies means that in the event of a cyber attack or failure, you are responsible for backing up any data that they use. tools are used, not your cloud provider, points out Brian Spanswick, CISO and head of IT at Cohesity.

To protect their data, companies must proactively establish mechanisms to protect, backup and restore all data used by SaaS tools across the enterprise, Spanswick writes.

“Relying on carriers’ default retention and recovery policies just isn’t enough.”

(TechCrunch+ is our membership program that helps founders and startup teams get ahead. You can sign up here.)

Big Tech Inc.

Spotify is testing new car mode: As you hit the road again for the commute in the waning period of COVID restrictions we live in, you may have noticed that Spotify looks a little different in your car. Well, consider it confirmed: Spotify is experimenting with new Car Mode versions. Although they will remain just that for the time being: experiments. US accuses Russian spies of domestic hacking: here’s a little note on the national aspect of hacking. It’s a big company. And the United States blames four Russian hackers for a “year-long hacking campaign targeting critical infrastructure, including a US nuclear power plant and a Saudi petrochemical facility.” Joe.
This post EU, US reach ‘agree in principle’ on transatlantic data flows – TechCrunch was original published at “https://techcrunch.com/2022/03/25/daily-crunch-eu-us-reach-agreement-in-principle-on-trans-atlantic-data-flows/”

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